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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 31  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 55-66

Associations between sociodemographic characteristics, pre migratory and migratory factors and psychological distress just after migration and after resettlement: The Indian migration study


1 Centre for Control of Chronic Conditions, Public Health Foundation of India, New Delhi NCR, India
2 Cochrane Heart Group and Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London; Department of Non-communicable Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom
3 Department of Non-communicable Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom
4 National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bangalore, India
5 Centre for Control of Chronic Conditions, Public Health Foundation of India, New Delhi NCR; Public Health Foundation of India, New Delhi NCR, India
6 Public Health Foundation of India, New Delhi NCR, India
7 School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom
8 Centre for Control of Chronic Conditions, Public Health Foundation of India, New Delhi NCR, India; Department of Non-communicable Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Sutapa Agrawal
Centre for Control of Chronic Conditions, Public Health Foundation of India, New Delhi
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-9962.162028

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Background / Objectives: Migration is suspected to increase the risk for psychological distress for those who enter a new cultural environment. We investigated the association between sociodemographic characteristics, premigratory and migratory factors and psychological distress in rural-to-urban migrants just after migration and after resettlement. Methods: Data from the cross-sectional sib-pair designed Indian Migration Study (IMS, 2005-2007) were used. The analysis focused on 2112 participants aged ≥18 years from the total IMS sample (n = 7067) who reported being migrant. Psychological distress was assessed based on the responses of the 7-questions in a five-point scale, where the respondents were asked to report about their feelings now and also asked to recall these feelings when they first migrated. The associations were analyzed using multiple logistic regression models. Results: High prevalence of psychological distress was found just after migration (7.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.2-8.4) than after settlement (4.7%; 95% CI: 3.8-5.6). Push factors as a reason behind migration and not being able to adjust in the new environment were the main correlates of psychological distress among both the male and female migrants, just after migration. Conclusions: Rural-urban migration is a major phenomenon in India and given the impact of premigratory and migratory related stressors on mental health, early intervention could prevent the development of psychological distress among the migrants.


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