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BRIEF COMMUNICATION
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 35  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 93-97

Behavioral addiction as a comorbidity to pathological gambling: Implication for screening and intervention in health setting


1 Department of Clinical Psychology, SHUT Clinic (Service for Healthy Use of Technology), National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Epidemiology, Centre for Public Health, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
3 Department of Psychiatry, Centre for Addiction Medicine, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
4 Department of Biostatistics, National Institute of Mental health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
5 Department of Clinical Psychology, National Institute of Mental health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Manoj Kumar Sharma
Department of Clinical Psychology, SHUT Clinic (Service for Healthy Use of Technology), NIMHANS, Bengaluru, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijsp.ijsp_109_17

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Background: Gambling has been portrayed in many anecdotes in the culture of India as an addiction associated with psychosocial dysfunctions. The present study assessed pathological gambling and other behavioral addictions as a comorbid condition in an urban Indian community. Materials and Methods: A total of 3250 individuals were approached to report on gambling behavior and other behavioral addictions using a door-to-door survey approach and 2755 participated in the study. The Lie–Bet Tool for gambling, Behavioral Addiction Screening Checklist, and Internet Addiction Test were administered. Results: Of those surveyed in the age group of 18–50 years, 1.2% reported pathological gambling along with the presence of eating, mobile phone, or television addiction. Only 0.3% of the participants reported the need to change gambling behaviors. Conclusions: These findings have implications for screening and intervention for the management of behavioral addictions that are comorbid with gambling.


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