Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2015  |  Volume : 31  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 100--106

A survey of suicidality and views on suicide in an Indian sample of adults


Nilamadhab Kar1, Jagadisha Thirthalli2 
1 Department of Psychiatry, Black Country Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Steps to Health, Showell Circus, Low Hill, Wolverhampton, United Kingdom
2 Department of Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Nilamadhab Kar
Department of Psychiatry, Black Country Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Steps to Health, Showell Circus, Low Hill, Wolverhampton, WV10 9TH
United Kingdom

Background: Suicide is a major public health concern in India. There is limited information regarding views about suicide and suicidality in the community. Aims: It was intended to study the suicidal cognitions and behavior in a sample of adults in India along with views about suicide. Methodology: It was a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based, anonymous survey conducted in four tertiary level medical centers. The subjects included patients and their attendants and health professionals in the organizations. The questionnaire included items on suicidal cognitions, suicide attempt history, current and past physical and mental illness, stress, views on suicide and the interventions along with information on the sociodemographic variables. Results: A considerable proportions of participants reported lifetime suicidal cognitions: Life not worth living, 44.2%; death wish, 26.9%; suicidal ideas, 24.6%; made suicidal plans, 12.4%; and 7.1% had a history of suicide attempt. These cognitions were significantly associated with suicide attempt. There was a general awareness of risks and supportive measures. The finding that 29.7% of participants might consider suicide for themselves in certain circumstances suggested the degree of acceptability of suicide in the community. Contrasting views were also present where suicide was considered as a sin by 66.2%, but 10.4% felt that their religion allows it in certain situations. The majority of participants felt that suicide is preventable. Conclusions: Suicidal thought and behaviors were common in the community. The results suggest that there is still a need for public education increasing awareness about the risks, support systems available in the local community and timely help-seeking that may improve the scope for suicide prevention.


How to cite this article:
Kar N, Thirthalli J. A survey of suicidality and views on suicide in an Indian sample of adults.Indian J Soc Psychiatry 2015;31:100-106


How to cite this URL:
Kar N, Thirthalli J. A survey of suicidality and views on suicide in an Indian sample of adults. Indian J Soc Psychiatry [serial online] 2015 [cited 2020 Oct 24 ];31:100-106
Available from: https://www.indjsp.org/article.asp?issn=0971-9962;year=2015;volume=31;issue=2;spage=100;epage=106;aulast=Kar;type=0